Entries in Teaching (88)

Editorial Bridal Magazine Shoot Part 3 of 3

So it's time for the last 6 pages of the editorial shoot for Utah Valley Bride magazine. I hope your week has been good so far? Personally I've been spending a total of 5 hours in the dentist chair, and then in pain most of the rest of the time :-) 

Photography is forever a very fun profession, always new things to learn, always room for improvment. 

This is my very favorite of the 18 pages, I coached the groom before we shot, did a few practise runs. He was so good at taking direction and having the right expressions. I love the placement and spacing in it, remember with studio flash I cant shoot 9 frames a second, but get one attempt per jump. We only shoot a few because it just worked so well and we got it on one of the first attempts.

One of my favorite things with this image is the luggage. I brought it with me from Norway in a 40ft container when we moved here in 2000. The small brown one by his feet is one I found at a used store that was exactly like the one my GrandPa always used going to work. So it was exciting to find one and get to use it.


As you can see Mary had a good time using this prop.Best of all you really get contact with her eyes even with such a little part of them showing. What a great girl she is.prp

I think the old style pop bottles look good in there. Again I have to compliment Tyler and Mary for their energy and expressions in every shot.

You can tell how Mary enjoy hassling him. I love his nose. This is another shot where I really like the spacing between their upper bodies. I'm very particular about looking around them before I shoot, especially between them. It makes a difference to have the peace and graphich from the fine tuning in the pose..

I sure enjoyed this shoot, usually we have at least 3 different brides and no groom. Working with them the whole time helped us to stay in the zone and to get a theme having the same feel about it from beginning to end.

To see the whole magazine click on this link: Utah Valley Bride 2013.

Have a great weekend, I will have a new blog post Monday from a cover shoot of the band Neon Trees in Hollywood. 

Kenneth who loves his Elinchrom lights and his Canon cameras.

 

Editorial Bridal Magazine Shoot Part 2 of 3

Posted on Wednesday, January 9, 2013 at 12:16PM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , , , , , , | Comments2 Comments | References13 References

Here we go again. 6 more images and some thoughts about them. Client Bennett Communication for Utah Valley Bride magazine 2013.  

People often talk about posed vs unposed. If you watch a movie every single shot is (posed). Try to think of creating situation, here is a simple one, dancing. The good thing about controlled posing is we can make sure they look good and have good light. It is very rare to see well lit flattering angels on the couple from 100% candid shots. So maybe try to think movie?

I love old cameras, this on is a Bushman 4x5 that was given to me back in the 80's by a retired Accociated Press photographer. It's the camera you see on top of my head in my FB, branding head shots. If the camera could speak I'm sure it has seen a lot. BTW I love Jimmy Choo shoes.

Even the little Yo-Yo makes him get a natural body pose. She is busy trying to look though her glasses and be cool :-)

People really free them self up if they can put on sun glasses, masks and so forth, they are suddenly way less shy.

I like the closeness of their heads but still have a little space rather then smooching them together. and have parts of their faces covering one another.

I often joke about the groom being a prop in the brides pictures, here he is :-)

PS. I will post the last 6 images in 2 days, thanks for stopping by.

 

The Importance of Lighting Up the Eyes

Posted on Wednesday, December 21, 2011 at 06:46PM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , , , | Comments4 Comments | References291 References

So many photographic magazine articles, blog posts, web images, FB posts and even weddings I see these days contain NO close up pictures where we can see lit eyes as well as details in the dress detail. So many have one or the other; in other words, good details in the dress but dark eyes or vice versa. I'm not getting into the reasons why in this article, I think you all know why a client would like to have both. ;-)  It's not that hard and I have made many blog posts on how to do it with varying techniques, but I wanted to bring it to "light" again because I feel it's so important.

I think a client deserves to see their eyes AND details in the dress. Eyes are the mirror of the soul, some say. The longer I have photographed the more I have realized that most of the expression comes through the eyes. PLEASE be professional and make sure clients also get to see the sparkle in the eyes, not just cool kissing photos off in the distance. I have choosen to pick 7 closer pictures from the same bridal where you see the eyes and still have details in the dress. No raccoon eyes. ;-) I also added some thoughts/info under each one.

Happy shooting and a very Merry Christmas! Sorry if I sound irritaded but I just feel bad for the clients, often spending thousands on a dress, make up, etc. just to not get the important details recorded well. 

Back light always works well with brides wearing a veil, especially if they have dark hair, often on blonde brides we need to put a diffusior between the sun and bride.

Try to use the flowers as a tool, create a waist line if needed, do not hide all the beautiful details on the top of a dress.

I like the flowers to be part of a portrait sometimes. They can, of course, often compete with the bride for attention but in this case I put them against a warm background to not be so powerful like they are against the dress. Also placed them to the back and side to still give a feel of the dress design.

Just loved the warm reflections in the office building. It helps to have the veil frame her face, so her skintone doesn't go into the background too much. This and the above pictures are also a good example of how I might go from 3/4 to close up on the same set up, just moving the flowers.

Just boring asphalt is one of my favorites backgrounds for bridal portraits.

I like the white building as a back ground; in this case to neautralize the dress and get more attention to the face. We also used one tungsten spot to backlight and one on her face. This gives a warmer light and different color temperature which also helps set her face apart from the rest of the picture. Happy Holidays!

The Value of an 8 x 10" (20x25cm)

Posted on Friday, December 2, 2011 at 04:53PM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , , , | Comments6 Comments | References2 References

Years ago a photographer friend of mine told me a true sales example of how he perceived the value of a picture. He was at a client's home doing a sale's appontment and they reacted to his price of $85 for an 8x10. This was around 1990 and we were still shooting film. Looking over at the client's book shelf he saw an old, beautiful 8 x 10" black and white photograph of a couple. He went over to the bookshelf to have a closer look at it and said: I love this picture, it is so beautiful. I would love to buy it from you, what about $200? The wife answered: It's my grandparents and the only copy we have, so there is no way I will sell it; it means a lot to me. My friend said what about $300? She answered it is worth more than money to me. Then he said: And you think it is to expensive to pay $85 for the one of your own family?

I hope this post can put some thoughts in your mind on the value of what we do and what we should charge; we are creating so many priceless treasures for people. Let's treat our work as what it truly is, wrap it in silk paper, hold it up carefully by the edges when we show it to our clients and be respectful of the truth worth of beautiful images.

The picture above is of my parents, taken on their wedding day February 23rd, 1952 in Asker outside Oslo, Norway. It was during the 1952 Oslo Winter Olymipcs. The picture was taken by Harald Ohnstad, who was the very first photographer I worked for (in 1972). Oh, how I wish I had a signed original print of this image.

PS.  May 17 2013

Since I wrote this post back in Dec 2011 this picture has increased even more in value to me. My Dad died a few weeks ago, so I treasure it more then ever. Hope my work do and will do the same as this do to me. 

R.I.P Jens Linge, Respectfully your son Kenneth

Expression and Communication in the Digital Age

Posted on Thursday, June 23, 2011 at 04:24PM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in | Comments7 Comments | References3 References

Today I want to talk about communication in the digital age. I been working full time in Photography for 35 years now, so yes I'm getting old, but I started early. It's been so fun to watch the changes in the photographic profession over the years from hiding under some black material years ago to how we today hide behind our DSLR's.

I know it's exceptions to every thing, that some people have worked with Leica and 135 SLR's their whole life, but the main new thing is that curious little fascinating screen we now got on the back of our cameras.

What is the great news is creativity is up with todays technology, bust sadly expression is down, let's talk about it.

This is my friend and great photographer Devin, sporty to model this illustration pictures for me.

The way most portrait and wedding photographers worked for decades was with medium format cameras. I loved how they had the view finder where you could just look straight down and be right back at communicating with your client like with this Hasselblad. Photographers also took most of their pictures on a tripod, I often call tripod creativity destroyers, but it's absolutely some great things about them. For portrait sessions in the studio and often on location I like to use a tripod to be more free to communicate with my clients, also love a release cord, wireless or not.

Try to imagine yourself being photographed by Devin here for a minute. He is now SHOOTING you with a Canon haha. He is in full hiding from you and any eye to eye communication.

Turning the camera gives you a great view of him and the camera, love his expression BTW :-)

But here comes one of the BIG NO NO's which is one of the main points of this blog post. He goes straight to looking at the screen on the back of the camera after taking the pictures. Does he think you look funny? Well this is what almost every photographer I been observing in the digital age is doing, I been studying a lot of them working.

Start by telling your clients to not worry how they look as you are doing some test shots, making sure the light is great etc etc, get them relaxed and when your exposure color etc is right, get done with the screen for a while. Then give your main attention to the client, communicate with them, help create moments, get strong good contact.

See how much better it is when Devin is looking at you taking interest and focus on you rather then the screen on the back. What is more important then making people look good with GREAT expressions which is of course not necessary a smile which to many people measure the success of a photograph by.

PS. Let me ask you a favor, I love comments on my blog post, but I am a bit sick of people correcting my english when it got nothing with making it more understandable. English is my 2nd language and I'm sure if you don't happen to be Norwegian you rather read my bad english. I hate to write about any thing negative, but...

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