Entries in Lighting (58)

5 Olympic Gold Medalists Session Part 1 of 3

Posted on Thursday, January 19, 2012 at 12:05AM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , | Comments2 Comments | References4 References

Canon EOS 1Ds-Mark III with 24-70mm f.2.8L @ 48mm and f.14. 400 ISO.

This was one of the most challenging and fun shoots that I have ever been asked to do as a photographer. Photograph 5 very historic olympic gold medalists in one shot. Between all of them they have won 14 olympic gold medals. Here are their names from the left: Bart Connor, Nadia Comaneci, Dan Jansen, Mike Eruzione and Bonnie Blair. I have posted some good links to learn more about them at the end of this blog post. Since this is a photographic blog, I will mainly focus on how I did the shoot.

Did a job like this make me nervous? (Alll 5 flew into Utah just for this shoot!) Yes, but every shoot does. They were so professional, no phones going off, or phonecalls made, full focus on the shoot. 

The shoot took place on the Monday after Thanksgiving. I rented 5 Profoto D1 500 Air lamps to have in addition to all my Elinchroms. We test shot on the Saturday before. I rented extra lamps so I could have 2 lighting set ups ready to go and be max effective. As I usually do when I mix brands of lamps, like in this shot, I use one brand for the lights in front of the subjects and another behind them.

My fill light is an Elinchrom 1000ws bounced of my wall/cealing that is painted in neutral grey. Studios are mostly white but many commercial photographers like black walls. I got the idea of neutral grey from Elinchrom's own studio. The main light is an Elinchrom 600ws in an Elinchrom Octa. The placement of this light is extremly esential in this case, where I need to get an even light across a large area. The key is to use the edge of the light, the lamp is almost pointing away from them; this way I only get about 1/2 an f stop difference from side to side. The first person just gets lit by the very edge, while the person the furthest away gets lit by more of the middle of the lamp. I hope I've explained this well enough. It is an awesome way to light large areas. There is about 1 f stop difference between the fill and the main light. The image underneath shows the back lighting. All three overview shots are thanks to my friend Pete Stott who also assisted on this shoot.

We used two Profoto D1 500 Air's with strip light soft boxes from behind. They needed to be pretty far out on the sides since I used wide angle in many of the shots. Also, I had to be careful to not get light spill from them on the background. In this shot you can see pretty well how the main light almost point away from them.

Canon EOS 1Ds-Mark III with 24-70mm f.2.8L @ 25mm and f.11. 400 ISO.

This is my favorite shot of them all. I also photographed them individually along with Bart and Nadia (married) together (Nadia was the first gymnast to score a perfect 10!). I will post 2 more blog posts one from Bart and Nadia's shoot and one with the 3 skaters.

As you can see in this overview, I'm laying on the floor shooting with the 24-70mm @ 25mm. It is very important to keep the subjects lined up on the same plane. I also have them lean towards me a bit to avoid too much distortion ( see how Bonnie Blair to the right in coming forward in this overview :-)  Shooting low and involving the floor gives a cool effect, but it sure takes a studio with a large background which I'm glad I have.

If you are interested in studio photography, then I recommend you follow my studio FB page: InStudio Photographics 

Here are some links if you want to read some of their amazing stories:

Bonnie Blair:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_Blair 

Nadia Comaneci:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nadia_Comaneci

Bart Connor:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bart_Conner

Dan Jansen:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Jansen

Mike Eruzione: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Eruzione

Movies:

Bonnie Blair: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2089667/

Nadia Comaneci:  http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0173536/

Bart Connor: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0175123/

Dan Jansen: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1139045/

Mike Eruzione: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0259942/


The Importance of Lighting Up the Eyes

Posted on Wednesday, December 21, 2011 at 06:46PM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , , , | Comments4 Comments | References292 References

So many photographic magazine articles, blog posts, web images, FB posts and even weddings I see these days contain NO close up pictures where we can see lit eyes as well as details in the dress detail. So many have one or the other; in other words, good details in the dress but dark eyes or vice versa. I'm not getting into the reasons why in this article, I think you all know why a client would like to have both. ;-)  It's not that hard and I have made many blog posts on how to do it with varying techniques, but I wanted to bring it to "light" again because I feel it's so important.

I think a client deserves to see their eyes AND details in the dress. Eyes are the mirror of the soul, some say. The longer I have photographed the more I have realized that most of the expression comes through the eyes. PLEASE be professional and make sure clients also get to see the sparkle in the eyes, not just cool kissing photos off in the distance. I have choosen to pick 7 closer pictures from the same bridal where you see the eyes and still have details in the dress. No raccoon eyes. ;-) I also added some thoughts/info under each one.

Happy shooting and a very Merry Christmas! Sorry if I sound irritaded but I just feel bad for the clients, often spending thousands on a dress, make up, etc. just to not get the important details recorded well. 

Back light always works well with brides wearing a veil, especially if they have dark hair, often on blonde brides we need to put a diffusior between the sun and bride.

Try to use the flowers as a tool, create a waist line if needed, do not hide all the beautiful details on the top of a dress.

I like the flowers to be part of a portrait sometimes. They can, of course, often compete with the bride for attention but in this case I put them against a warm background to not be so powerful like they are against the dress. Also placed them to the back and side to still give a feel of the dress design.

Just loved the warm reflections in the office building. It helps to have the veil frame her face, so her skintone doesn't go into the background too much. This and the above pictures are also a good example of how I might go from 3/4 to close up on the same set up, just moving the flowers.

Just boring asphalt is one of my favorites backgrounds for bridal portraits.

I like the white building as a back ground; in this case to neautralize the dress and get more attention to the face. We also used one tungsten spot to backlight and one on her face. This gives a warmer light and different color temperature which also helps set her face apart from the rest of the picture. Happy Holidays!

The Great Photographer ~ Michal  Tomaszewicz

Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2011 at 06:42AM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , | Comments5 Comments | References4 References

Today I want to present one of my favorite photographers and people Michal Tomaszewicz. You will see some great off camera flash photography with info under each picture. I been following Michals progress over the last 20+ years and he is one of those photographers that keep improving and have an amazing specter of technique and style. Michal is born in Poznan, Poland in 1965, based in Norway since 1981.

Title: "Cowgirl in the tub"  Camera Canon EOS 5D Mk II, Canon 20mm f/2.8. Light Bowens Esprit 1000ws with travel pack bounced into a Photoflex white umbrella.

Famous Norway national handbal team player Jan-Richard Lislerud Hansen photographed for his team Drammen HK's website etc. 2 Canon Speedlights 550 EX off camera triggered with Pocket wizzard TT5. No flash modifiers. Camera Canon EOS 5D Mk II. Lens Canon 17-40mm f/4.0.

 

Wedding picture of the year in Norway 2011. The groom is famous sculptor Nico Widerberg and his wife Camilla. The picture is taken on the way out after the ceremony with a Canon EOS 5D Mk II with a Canon 17-40mm f/2 L with a Canon speedlight 550 EX handheld on cable.

Self assignment. The image of the fish itself is bought on iStock.The waterbottle is photographed with two strobes bouncing off the wall behind the bottle. Michal blew bubbles with a straw into the water. He picked out the nicest looking bubbles and used them in this multiply layer image. Camera Sony Alpha DSLR A-900. Lens  Sony 70-200mm 2.8

This pictures is for the clothing company Sorbet off camera flash Bowens 1000ws with travel pack and a Photoflex softbox multidome Q39. The shoot started at 3:30am in the morning, this image is shot around 7 am in cloudy weather. Camera Hasselblad H3DII 31MP. Lens Hassselblad 50-11mm f/3.5-4.5 HC

I strongly reccomend you follow and like him on his Facebook page PHOTOSTUDIO-Tomaszewicz, link to web and blog from there. Michal also teach workshops on off camera flash photography worldwide.

Motion Blur Background on Cover Shot.

Posted on Wednesday, June 15, 2011 at 02:49PM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , | Comments2 Comments

The owner of the company One on One Marketing, Nick Greer, really wanted employees involved in the photo shoot. I still wanted the attention to be on 1 person on the cover. I decided to have a bunch of employees play basketball in the background and use a long exposure. I had to make sure Nick didn't move and that the people in the back ALL moved. It took a few attempts to nail it just the way I wanted, but I think it went well. The magazine got him on the cover, he got lots of employes in the shot :-) The basketball court is on the top floor of their building.

Equipment: Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III with a 50mm 1.4 @ f4.0. 1/12 sec. ISO 100 on a Manfrotto tripod. Main light Elinchrom strobe with a white reflective umbrella + a California Sun Bounce reflector with it's white side as a fill on his rigth side. 

 Here is a short video clip the editor Briana Stewart shot during one of our attempts.

In this shot we let Nick Greer blend with the crowd and show some if his great staff.

It was used as a 2-page spread to open the article. We knew this when we shot it and made sure nobody would end up in the crease, etc. Existing light + 1 LED 900 lamp to add more light to the room and especially to the people. Camera: Canon EOS 1Ds M III with a Canon 20-35mm f 2.8 L lens @ 5.0. 1/85sec. ISO 800.

I loved photographing (no, I did not SHOOT him:-) Nick in his office with great window light. We added a LED 160 lamp to get the light more around his face and give us freedom to have him not have to turn towards the window light as much. Lately I have been using daylight LED lamps and use a warm filter if necessary. I can dim them without color change which is one thing I love. I made sure to have peace around Nick's head and added the water bottle to get the company logo in the shot. LED is such an amazing light source to have added to our choices of light. Camera: Canon EOS 1D Mark III with a 50mm f1.4 at 2.8 and 1/60 sec. ISO 800.

PS. I know you would love more overviews from these shots, but it was such a fast pace job with so many people involved I didn't feel I could justify using their time on it. Maybe I will have to start bringing an extra person just to do overviews...Let me think about that one.

Midday Sun ~ Magazine Cover Shoot

Posted on Monday, May 2, 2011 at 03:09PM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , | Comments4 Comments | References6 References

Today I want to bring you through a magazine cover shoot and some inside photographs for an article we shot on Monday, April 11th. We had about 30 minutes to shoot: the cover with logo, bar code, etc. in mind, one picture for the editors letter, a table of contents shot, and an opening shot for the story inside (full page or spread). I also shot two individual shots that were used to go with their BIO's in the story.

Things to keep in mind: it's for the May/June issue of Utah Valley Magazine, so they want it to look summery and the mountains were full of snow as you can see in one of the overviews. We wanted green grass, with a little piece of baseball markings showing and the stadium providing the atmosphere and the BYU team colors. The time for the shoot was set to 12:30 pm with sunshine, and due to baseball practice, we had to follow their time schedule.

I said it before and I'll say it again: I love to photograph in midday sun! Remember that NOON (or the sun at its highest peak) is almost never 12 pm. That day it was at 1:28 pm in Provo, Utah, USA where the shoot took place. The appointment to shoot this cover was at 12:30 pm, (as I said, not my choice) but that is when it's useful to know something about light. I was early, like I always like to be, so I could set up and be ready to shoot at the time of the appointment.

This table of contents picture was shot before the scheduled shooting time of 12:30 while we are testing light for the cover.

We started by doing the cover shot (see underneath) using a California Sunbounce Sun-Swatter on a solid Manfrotto 007bu tripod to diffuse the bright sun hitting them. The tripod is sand bagged and also features a "lazy leg" adjustment for leveling the stand on uneven terrain. I also picked a shaded area mostly as a background, the magazine wanted the shot to show some grass and stadium. In the overview underneath you can see the California Sunbounce Mini Zebra and how we bounce with a  in on them. A very simple and very effective method for midday sun.

The two spreads underneath are also shot about 30 min from midday which is perfect down in the dugout. There is so much light bouncing in to the dugout since the sun is so close to it. In some of the shots we added a little soft/gold called Zebra in the CSB language. (Sun-Bounce to give the directional light a little more punch and add a little warmth on the subject so they would pop out even more from the blue background (which is a complimentary color to their skin and a color that creates distance).

Underneath you can see the full size file as shot. I composed this shot for a 2-page spread to start the story inside the magazine, the crease in the middle of the magazine is what I always have to keep in mind when I do that.

When I first had them sitting there, I also made sure to get some pictures of them individually. It was fun to see how much more comfortable they were sitting in the dugout than standing out on the field posing, they were in their right element. We could easily have used this for cover, but the magazine wanted some summer and the local stadium look. In the overview underneath, see how close the dugout is to being in the sun which gives it a nice tunnel effect of light with the roof making a perfect block overhead. I'm so in the zone when I shoot and I try to respect my clients time, so the overview is shot right after the we shots used. That was a wrap for the shoot, total time shooting with subjects on hand 30 min. I have a lot of respect of people's busy life and schedules and find it very important to be ready on time, and use no more time than necessary.

There's so much light coming into the shade from right outside the dugout, then just a tiny touch of California Sun-Bounce Zebra bounced in when needed for even more contrast and punch. 

Vernon Sanders Law (born March 12, 1930 in Meridian, Idaho) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher. He played 16 seasons (1950-1951and 1954-1967) for the Pittsburgh Pirates. World Series Champion with The Pirates in 1960. Law was a member of the National League All Star Team in 1960. He won the Cy Young Award, and led the National League in complete games that year.

Vance Aaron Law (born October 1, 1956 in Boise, Idaho) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball. From 1980 through 1991, he played for thePittsburgh Pirates (1980–81), Chicago White Sox (1982–84), Montreal Expos (1985–87), Chicago Cubs (1988–89), and Oakland Athletics (1991). He was an All-Star (NL) in: 1988. He also played one season in Japan for the Chunichi Dragons in 1990. Law batted and threw right-handed. He is the son of Cy Young Award winner Vern Law. He is currently the head baseball coachat Brigham Young University

 

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