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Expression ( A great subject )

Posted on Saturday, February 12, 2011 at 06:23AM by Registered Commenterkennethlinge in , , | Comments4 Comments | References4 References

 

A while ago I had the honor of photographing one of the nations VERY best story tellers Mr. Donald Davis of Ocracoke Island, North Carolina. I was very excited since I am very much into expressions which is for sure a must in a great photograph of a person. It was very good to have watched Mr. Davis perform before the shoot.

My job was to portray him as a storyteller to hang in a storyteller center. My message with this blog is to suggest if you want a very grateful subject for expressions find a storyteller and get him going telling a good story. I posted first a collage we made for a fund raiser performance, then each individual image underneath here in order so you can better see his expressions.

Hope you enjoy the pictures and have a very nice weekend. 

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Reader Comments (4)

I have heard Donald David many times. He was my minister in NC. He is a great storyteller and I can see where he would be fun to photograph. Great job capturing the Donald Davis I know.

February 13, 2011 | Unregistered Commenterkarla

Here is a similar story
What is the history of Expressions? When did it begin? Officially, it began in 1991 when Randall and Dianna Effner incorporated their new company and advertized the popular and widely acclaimed doll Aaron in the Doll Crafter magazine. But going back four years earlier, we would have seen the beginnings of Dianna's long association with the mold industry in 1987, when she created what came to be one of the most popular dolls of all time: Hilary. Or, we can go back even further, and visit Dianna in 1976, when she was sculpting her very first doll for a small doll factory in Illinois.

March 17, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterCharter Bus DC

it's such a great job!

March 17, 2011 | Unregistered Commentermintasa_clippingimages

Here is a similar story

After 30 years of renewed interest in facial expression as a key clue to human emotions, frowns are appearing on critics' faces. The face, they say, isn't the mirror to emotions it's been held out to be.

The use of facial expression for measuring people's emotions has dominated psychology since the late 1960s when Paul Ekman, PhD, of the University of California, San Francisco and Carroll Izard, PhD, of the University of Delaware, reawakened the study of emotion by linking expressions to a group of basic emotions.

Many took that work to imply that facial expressions provided the key to people's feelings. But in recent years the psychology literature has been sprinkled with hotly worded attacks by detractors who claim that there is no one-to-one correspondence between facial expressions and emotions. In fact, they argue, there's no evidence to support a link between what appears on someone's face and how they feel inside.

March 17, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterParty Bus DC

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